Metabolic Level

B1

Sleep to learn energy homeostasis


Schmid, Sebastian Michael, PD Dr. med.
Medizinische Klinik I – UKSH-Campus Lübeck,
Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck

Telefon: +49-451-5000 (->Pieper 2210)
E-Mail: Sebastian.Schmid@uk-sh.de

Hallschmid, Manfred, PD Dr.
Institut für Medizinische Psychologie und Verhaltensneurobiologie, Universität Tübingen
Otfried-Müller-Str. 25, 72076 Tübingen

Telefon: +49-7071-29-88925
E-Mail: manfred.hallschmid@uni-tuebingen.de


Summary
Recent evidence indicates that sleep contributes to the maintenance of energy homeostasis, with curtailed or disturbed sleep affecting glucose homeostasis and shifting energy balance toward surplus energy intake. The general assumption of this project is that sleep not only benefits the subsequent control of energy turnover, but actively promotes the integration of preceding metabolic input into the ongoing control of energy homeostasis by the central nervous system. Thus, preliminary findings of the previous funding period suggest that sleep supports the adaptation to repeated hypoglycemia. This hypoglycemia-based approach of investigating sleep-dependent metabolic memory formation will be continued and refined in the following 4 years, with a focus on the role of slow-wave sleep. Furthermore, this project will be extended and complemented by experiments focusing on sleep’s function in memory for food intake. Studies in humans indicate that memory for previous meal intake contributes to the control of eating behavior, and we will elucidate if the memory-promoting impact of sleep pertains to this memory domain and, also, to conditioned metabolic effects. Finally, we will investigate the relevance of neuropeptides involved in metabolic as well as cognitive functions (e.g., ghrelin and insulin) for sleep-associated processes of memory formation and energy homeostasis.

B4

Cardiovascular setpoints regulated by sleep


Sayk, Friedhelm,Dr. med.
Medizinische Klinik I, Universität Lübeck
Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck

Telefon: +49-451-500-2306
E-mail: friedhelm.sayk@uk-sh.de
Poets, Christian F., Prof. Dr. med.
Universitätsklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin Tübingen, Abt. Neonatologie
Calwerstrasse 7, 72076 Tübingen

Telefon: +49-7071 29-84742
E-mail: christian-f.poets@med.uni-tuebingen.de

Summary
Blood pressure and body weight are regulated by the central nervous system via the endocrine and the sympathetic nervous system. Sleep actively down-regulates the setpoint of baroreflex-mediated blood pressure (BP) regulation, which has strong effects on daytime BP. Growth hormone (GH) levels normally peak during sleep and this is hypothesized to critically contribute to sleep-related BP resetting. Sleep disturbances severely perturb this endocrine-sympathetic interaction, leading to sympathetic overactivity and impaired growth hormone profiles with the consequence of metabolic morbidity and hypertension. The present project examines the (patho-)physiology of sleep-related GH-baroreflex interactions and respective consequences for BP homeostasis during sleep and at daytime in healthy adults and hypertensive patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), with the aim of exploring the sleep-dependent plasticity of neuroendocrine-sympathetic interactions in the control of cardiovascular homeostasis. Studies in adults will be complemented by a parallel developmental approach in infants. Infants with the Pierre-Robin-sequence who suffer from severe OSA and growth retardation
will serve as an ideal model to further scrutinize the reciprocal dependency of sleep disturbances, altered GH levels, and developmental and cardiovascular disturbances. Therefore, we will extend our investigation to these children before and after orthodontic therapy.

B8

Sleep-dependent plasticity and metabolism during early life


Preißl, Hubert Dr.
MEG Zentrum, Universität Tübingen
Otfried-Müller-Str. 47, 72076 Tübingen

Telefon: +49-7071-29 87704
E-Mail: hubert.preissl@uni-tuebingen.de

Fritsche, Andreas, Prof. Dr.
Medizinische Klinik IV, Universität Tübingen
Otfried-Müller-Str. 10, 72076 Tübingen

Telefon: +49-7071-29 80590
E-Mail: andreas.fritsche@med.uni-tuebingen.de

Hallschmid, Manfred,PD Dr.
Institut für Medizinische Psychologie und Verhaltensneurobiologie, Universität Tübingen
Otfried-Müller-Str. 25, 72076 Tübingen

Telefon: +49-7071-29-88925
E-Mail: manfred.hallschmid@uni-tuebingen.de

Summary
The ability of fetuses to memorize specific external events is indicative of brain plasticity in the unborn. Against the background of epidemiological studies showing a positive association of maternal pre-pregnancy body weight and gestational weight gain with the child’s body weight, we assume that fetal plasticity also pertains to energy homeostasis including control of eating behavior in the neonate. With recent human and animal data indicating that wake-like states are present during embryonic life, the question arises how the plastic processing of metabolic and cognitive stimuli relates to emergent patterns of sleep and wakefulness. The over-arching aim of this project is to characterize the relationship between sleep and memory formation in the metabolic and cognitive domains in the fetus and, importantly, to assess its potential long-term impact during infancy. Specifically, we will investigate the impact of maternal body weight (gain) on patterns of sleep/wakefulness and food intake as well as on body composition in the neonate. On a methodological level, we will refine the fetal magnetoencephalographic (fMEG) assessment of sleep and wake-like behavior in the unborn child. This will allow us to examine sleep-dependent plastic cognitive processes in dependence of maternal metabolic status in the fetus and neonate.

Last Update: 26.06.2013